What Thoughts Bring You Joy?

Photo by  Frank Busch  on  Unsplash

Photo by Frank Busch on Unsplash

The thoughts you think hold a certain energetic signature, or frequency, that all other matter and energy responds to. It is so subtle that you wouldn’t even know immediately that anything had been affected by what you were thinking. Yet, there is a great effect and you hold the power in your mind.

I believe the first step in harnessing this exceptional power lies in first acknowledging your thoughts, the inner dialogue running through your head at any given moment of the day. They’ve always been there, like an old friend. Perhaps this is the reason they may tend to go unnoticed. They help you make sense of what you are observing, help you work through solutions to challenges you face, help you make connections to previous experiences. Thoughts are helpful. However, they can also hold us back and be damaging if we allow it. This happens when we judge others and when we judge ourselves. When we think negative thoughts about ourselves, we hold ourselves back from being who we are truly meant to be.

Let us leave aside our thoughts of other people for the time being and focus inward. What thoughts do you think about yourself? If you are anything like me, then you annihilate yourself on a daily basis (or used to). I have only recently, within the past 5 years, started to notice what I think to myself, about myself. What I realized is that I harshly judged myself for basically every aspect of my life. “My friend is making a six-figure salary, why aren’t I? I obviously don’t have the skills to make that kind of money.” “That woman just had a baby and she doesn’t have an ounce of cellulite. I get pregnant and, boom! There it is and it’s not going away.” “Gosh, I wish I hadn’t just said that. Now they’ll think I’m a total idiot.” “My mouth is crooked when I talk. Has it always been that way and I never noticed? Why can’t I have a perfectly symmetrical mouth like everyone else seems to have?” “What makes me think I can run a business? I’ve never done this before and I’m so out of my league.” I could go on; you get the picture.

Not one of these thoughts makes me a better person. It also makes me judge other people as well, especially the people closest to me who love me and have my back and don’t deserve one shred of judgment I cast upon them. I do it to them because I’m so used to doing this to myself. And this is not okay.

Once we become aware of our inner dialogue as conscious beings, only then can we shift our thoughts to a positive place. I have found the best way to do this is by taking the thought and reframing it in the direction of love or joy. This is not as simple as it sounds because it forces you to be conscious of the unconscious thoughts that immediately pop in your head. Where do these thoughts come from? This may take some exploration. It takes practice and gets easier over time and you need to be an active participant in it. If you care to point your thoughts in the direction of love and joy, it needs to be a priority and something you continually work at. This is the first step in truly loving ourselves. As I state on the homepage, “Love yourself. Love the world.”

Here are a few examples of reframing in the direction of love and joy:

  1. From: “My friend is making a six-figure salary, why aren’t I? I obviously don’t have the skills to make that kind of money.”

    To: “I am so proud of my friend for earning what she deserves. I know I could do the same if I put a plan together and work toward it.”

  2. From: “What makes me think I can run a business? I’ve never done this before and I’m so out of my league.”

    To: “Starting a business is scary but it’s exciting. I’m looking forward to everything I’m going to learn. I have my work cut out for me and I know I can do it.”

  3. From: “I can’t believe how tired my face looks. And what’s with all these age spots?”

    To: “My eyes look tired today but my skin is glowing. I love how my eyes light up when I smile.”

Think thoughts of yourself that you can believe and that make you happy. Ultimately, this is what it’s all about — you being your happiest self. Do I mean happy all the time? No, this is not realistic. But I believe being happy most of the time is completely possible and it begins with you thinking loving thoughts about yourself. What can you believe? What thoughts bring you joy? I’d love to know.

Lenora QuartoComment